Area Winter Will Be A White One, Almanac Says | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Area Winter Will Be A White One, Almanac Says

Play associated audio
Weather patterns are suggesting that D.C. residents should expect a snowier winter than last year.
Dominic Campbell: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dominiccampbell/4350651654/
Weather patterns are suggesting that D.C. residents should expect a snowier winter than last year.

The nation's second-oldest almanac is predicting heavy snowstorms in the region this winter. Forecasters say the outlook is based on the size of a developing El Nino temperature pattern in the Pacific Ocean.

Published reports claim the 2013 HagersTown Town and Country Almanack released this week predicts two December nor'easters that would affect the Mid-Atlantic. The first snow could fall as early as November 28, and forecasters say snowfall could still occur through the end of March.

The forecast includes 15 possible heavy snow days.

Almanac weather predictor William O'Toole points out warmer temperatures in the Pacific can affect weather worldwide. O'Toole adds if El Nino is weak to moderate, there could be 50 inches of snow or more. If it's strong, the winter will be wet and warm.

NPR

Director Mike Nichols Remembered As A Comedian, Raconteur, Charmer

Robert Siegel remembers director and film icon Mike Nichols, who died Wednesday of a heart attack at 83.
NPR

Moderate Drinker Or Alcoholic? Many Americans Fall In Between

A study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds that 1 in 3 adults drinks excessively. That means eight or more drinks per week for women, and 15 or more drinks a week for men.
NPR

'I Will Not Sit Idly By' And Other Congressional Tweets On Immigration

Congress is out of session until the first week of December, so many members are weighing in on the president's speech on Twitter and other platforms — with mixed reactions.
NPR

Keep Your Head Up: 'Text Neck' Takes A Toll On The Spine

Newly published research finds that common texting posture can put as much as 60 pounds of force on the cervical spine.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.