Area Winter Will Be A White One, Almanac Says | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Area Winter Will Be A White One, Almanac Says

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Weather patterns are suggesting that D.C. residents should expect a snowier winter than last year.
Dominic Campbell: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dominiccampbell/4350651654/
Weather patterns are suggesting that D.C. residents should expect a snowier winter than last year.

The nation's second-oldest almanac is predicting heavy snowstorms in the region this winter. Forecasters say the outlook is based on the size of a developing El Nino temperature pattern in the Pacific Ocean.

Published reports claim the 2013 HagersTown Town and Country Almanack released this week predicts two December nor'easters that would affect the Mid-Atlantic. The first snow could fall as early as November 28, and forecasters say snowfall could still occur through the end of March.

The forecast includes 15 possible heavy snow days.

Almanac weather predictor William O'Toole points out warmer temperatures in the Pacific can affect weather worldwide. O'Toole adds if El Nino is weak to moderate, there could be 50 inches of snow or more. If it's strong, the winter will be wet and warm.

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