Warning, Gridlock Ahead: Terrible Traffic Tuesday Hitting D.C. Region | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Warning, Gridlock Ahead: Terrible Traffic Tuesday Hitting D.C. Region

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Labor Day means the end of summer, and it also means the end of relatively light traffic days throughout the D.C. region.
Armando Trull
Labor Day means the end of summer, and it also means the end of relatively light traffic days throughout the D.C. region.

The morning after Labor Day is known as Terrible Traffic Tuesday -The monicker, which comes from Triple A marks the official end to summer vacations. 

Gridlock is expected to swell by 26 percent, according to the Transportation Planning Board. And, in addition to those 2.8 million commuters, expect an additional 7,000 school buses on the road. 

Lisa Rawls of Falls Church says she already has a plan to cope. "I resigned myself early on to books on tape," she says. 

The fall traffic season makes Brehon Gay from Upper Marlboro leave for work plenty of time to spare. "I just try to get out early to beat traffic," he says. 

That's a good idea. It will take commuters an extra 5 minutes on average to get where they need to go tomorrow, according to AAA Mid-Atlantic. 

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