'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' Author Richard Bach Injured In Plane Crash | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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'Jonathan Livingston Seagull' Author Richard Bach Injured In Plane Crash

Pilot and author Richard Bach was hurt Friday when the small plane he was flying tangled in power lines as he attempted to land, according to media reports.

Bach, who is 76, was flying on San Juan Island, Wash., about 100 miles north of Seattle, when the crash occurred. The San Juan Islander says Bach "snagged" the electrical lines, snapped two power poles in half and landed upside down in grass. Live power lines fell to the ground.

According to a report on his website, Bach was apparently rescued by two passersby who got him out of the aircraft and called for help. His son James told The Associated Press that Bach has a broken shoulder and a head injury, and he's waiting for his father to wake up from sedation.

Bach has written more than a dozen books and many are related to flight, such as Stranger to the Ground and Biplane. His most famous book on flight is Jonathan Livingston Seagull, the brief tale of a young seagull who discovers himself through perfecting his ability to fly. It was enormously popular and led to a movie featuring a soundtrack by Neil Diamond.

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