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Bid For Third Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Plant Denied

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For the time being, Calvert Cliffs will remain home to just two nuclear reactors.
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
For the time being, Calvert Cliffs will remain home to just two nuclear reactors.

Opponents of nuclear power expansion in Maryland are celebrating a big win. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has denied a bid to build a third nuclear power plant at Maryland's Calvert Cliffs.

A coalition of local civic groups successfully argued that the plan to build a third reactor would have violated the 1954 Atomic Energy Act. That law prohibits issuing a nuclear license to a company owned or controlled by a foreign country.

Unistar, the company the first proposed the new nuclear plant in 2007, is 100 percent French-owned.

The three-judge Atomic Safety and Licensing Board has given Unistar 60 days to find U.S. partner firms, but the ruling noted that Unistar has already had two years to fix the situation, and hasn't appeared to make any progress.

This is just second time a new reactor license was denied by the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board.

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