Isaac Drives Gas Prices Up In D.C. Area | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Isaac Drives Gas Prices Up In D.C. Area

Play associated audio
Isaac is driving up gas prices in the D.C. area.
Jessica Jordan
Isaac is driving up gas prices in the D.C. area.

Isaac may not be headed our way, but it's driving up gas prices in the region. That's because 40 percent of U.S. refining capacity comes from the Gulf area.

As AAA Mid-Atlantic's Windy VanCuren explains, it's not that the storm poses an imminent threat to reserves, but those who set oil prices use the circumstances as an indicator of what may happen to supply.

"They have to cut the power off to make sure no water gets mixed in with the oil, and just take safety productions," says VanCuren. "About 80 percent of refiners down there have shut off production to protect themselves while the storm hits. And when that happens, although we have plenty of supply on hand, people get nervous and because of the nervousness of there being maybe an impact to supply prices start to go up."

VanCuren says there's no way of knowing how much prices will peak between now and then. National forecasts suggest that gas prices will be the highest on record for an extended Labor Day weekend.

NPR

Beyond The Bestsellers: Nancy Pearl Recommends 'Under The Radar' Reads

NPR's go-to books guru has sent host Steve Inskeep a stack of books — titles she thinks deserve more attention than they've been getting. Here are her fiction picks, to kick off your summer reading.
NPR

Census Reveals Universe Of Marine Microbes At Bottom Of The Food Chain

The ocean's tiniest inhabitants — including bacteria, plankton, krill — are food for most everything that swims or floats. Now, scientists have completed a count of this vast and diverse hidden world.
NPR

Congressional Stalemate Threatens To Kill Phone Data Program

Congress continues to debate the USA Patriot Act. A key provision allowing the bulk collection of Americans' phone records expires at the end of the month.
NPR

Mechanical Turk Workers: Secret Cogs In The Internet Marketplace

There are hundreds of thousands of people doing stuff to your Internet experience that you may think is the work of an algorithm. They're working from home doing tiny tasks computers can't quite do.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.