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Gray To Push Campaign Finance Reform Proposal

Legislation would tackle pay-to-play practices

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The proposed legislation would address many of the gray areas in campaign fundraising law that have surfaced in the last year.
Larry Miller: http://www.flickr.com/photos/drmillerlg/1246397248/
The proposed legislation would address many of the gray areas in campaign fundraising law that have surfaced in the last year.

D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray will roll out his proposed reforms to the city’s campaign finance laws later today.

Gray and Attorney General Irv Nathan are announcing what they’re calling, "pay-to-play prohibitions." They would bar those who have or are seeking contracts or grants with the city valued at $250,000 or above from donating money to any elected official or candidate who could be involved in the approval process.

Nathan says the message of the proposed legislation is clear: money doesn't buy government action.

The proposal would also tackle the "LLC Loophole" — that’s when people or businesses use affiliated LLCs and/or subsidiary companies to make multiple donations and, in essence, skirt contribution limits.  The bill would require donations by a corporation to be attributed to the controlling shareholder and any affiliated companies.

Gray's proposal would also ban money order contributions greater than $25, bar lobbyists from bundling contributions, and hold candidates more accountable for what their political committees do.

Some of the key provisions in the mayor s proposal mirror legislation proposed last year by council member Tommy Wells. Those amendments were voted down 12-1 each time.  The mayor is hoping for a different result this time around.

The bill will be formally sent to the D.C. Council next month.

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