WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Montgomery County Introduces New Fines

Play associated audio
Drivers who roll past stopped schools buses in Montgomery County that are picking up children will face a $250 fine.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/bsabarnowl/6928901057/
Drivers who roll past stopped schools buses in Montgomery County that are picking up children will face a $250 fine.

This will be the first school year in Montgomery County that cameras will be attached to the extending arms of school buses. Those cameras will be on the lookout for vehicles that drive past buses when they are stopped and the arm is extended.

Drivers who break the law will face fines of $250. The county fire department is also warning drivers that children, particularly younger ones, are not always the most reliable pedestrians. They're urging drivers to go slower in areas where kids are walking.

Meanwhile, county authorities are also stepping up efforts to combat cyber-bullying among students. County state's attorney John McCarthy says it's part of an overall Internet safety campaign that his office, the police, and school system are pushing.

"We have 150,000 kids, and if you are enrolled in a school in Montgomery County, you will be receiving information about Internet safety," he says. "Things as basic like for very young kids about not sharing personal information with people you meet online... not meeting people offline you do not know."

Since kids are typically far more knowledgeable about social networking sites than their parents, McCarthy has a few bits of advice for parents who may see sudden changes in their child's behavior, which may be a possible sign they are a victim of cyber-bullying.

For Facebook, McCarthy suggests a move that will likely embarrass many children. "Make sure your child friends you," he says. "So that you'll be able to monitor online the kinds of chatter and kinds of things that are being directed to your child online."

And if a parent is not sure what "LOL," "SMH," or "OMG," may mean, McCarthy says they aren't the only ones. "The police, the state's attorney's office, and the schools all distribute vocabulary lists of what these words mean, and what these abbreviations mean," he says.

McCarthy says 88 percent of kids between the ages of 13 and 17 have been subject to some form of bullying, be it online or face-to-face, and underscoring the severity of the problem.

NPR

A Love Letter To Literature: Reading Gabo In 'The Paris Review'

Gabriel Garcia Marquez died Thursday. It would be hard to overstate the importance of his novels, but author Gustavo Arellano recommends getting to know him in a different medium.
NPR

In The Land Of Razor Clams, Dinner Hides Deep Within The Sand

Clam-digging satisfies that primeval urge to go out into nature and find free food. And inveterate Washington state clam-diggers admit they compete to get their daily limit of fifteen clams.
NPR

In Virginia, Politicians Fish For Support At Old-Fashioned Event

Even as technology and social media transform politics, some traditions still live on — like the annual Shad Planking festival in Wakefield. It's a must-attend event on Virginia's political calendar.
NPR

Should College Dropouts Be Honored By Their Alma Maters?

From a Top Gun sequel starring drones to Howard University's pick of Puff Daddy as its commencement speaker, the Barbershop guys weigh in on the week's news.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.