WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Officials Update Earthquake Emergency Procedure

Play associated audio
In this Aug. 24, 2011, file photo, damage to the Washington National Cathedral is seen the day after a earthquake shook Washington and much of the East Coast.
AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File
In this Aug. 24, 2011, file photo, damage to the Washington National Cathedral is seen the day after a earthquake shook Washington and much of the East Coast.

The 5.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the D.C. region one year ago has changed the way officials view emergency preparedness. Emergency response plans that focus only on hurricanes, tornados, flooding, and snow have been or are being amended to include earthquakes.

Some states have enacted laws specifically related to the earthquake, and there is anecdotal evidence of a spike in insurance coverage for earthquake damage.

Federal and local officials stressed that residents, officials and governments should all have emergency response plans in place for a whole number of scenarios, including earthquakes.

In the D.C. area, authorities stressed the importance of not rushing out into the street or trying to leave work to flee home in the event of an earthquake, which is how they say how many residents reacted during last year's temblor.

The earthquake was centered 3 or 4 miles below Mineral, a central Virginia town, with fewer than 500 people.

The damage was estimated to be more than $200 million, and was powerful enough to cause cracks in the Washington Monument and damages to the National Cathedral.

WAMU 88.5

Readers' Review: "The Good Lord Bird" By James McBride

For our next Readers' Review: National Book Award winner "The Good Lord Bird" by James McBride. The 2013 novel follows an enslaved boy who gets caught up in John Brown's abolitionist mission...and must disguise himself as a girl to survive.

WAMU 88.5

Busboys And Poets In Anacostia: Development Or Gentrification?

Local restaurant chain Busboys and Poets will soon open in Anacostia, which suffers from a dearth of dining and shopping options-- but some within the community are decrying the opening as gentrification.

WAMU 88.5

A Primary Challenge For A Top Arlington County Democrat

Could bipartisanship be the ouster of Arlington County's board chair?

NPR

In Omaha, A Library With No Books Brings Technology To All

The privately funded, $7 million Do Space provides free access to computers, high-end software, 3-D printers, and laser cutters. It's a learning and play space, as well as an office for entrepreneurs.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.