Confederate Soldier In Famous Portrait Is Identified | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Confederate Soldier In Famous Portrait Is Identified

The Washington Post brings us an interesting story about a portait that was donated to the Library of Congress.

As far as portraits from the Civil War go, this one is quite famous. It shows a confederate soldier looking a bit disheveled and very serious while holding an 1855 Springfield single-shot pistol carbine.

The portrait appeared in the Ken Burns series about the Civil War. When the Liljenquist family donated the portrait to the Library of Congress, however, it was catalogued as a picture of an "unidentified soldier in Confederate uniform."

But, now, the mystery has unravelled. The Washington Post reports:

"Last month, through a chance meeting at a Civil War memorabilia show, the old photograph was identified as that of Confederate soldier Stephen Pollard of Carroll County, Ga., who fought in and survived the war.

"And it turned out that the identity had been known in Georgia but apparently not far beyond."

The picture was recognized by Pollard's great-great-granddaughter. According to the Post, she called Tom Liljenquist, who originally bought the portrait, and told him she could identify one of the people in his collection.

"I think he was more shocked than I was," she told the paper.

Indeed, this wasn't a great mystery. The Georgia Sharp Shooters, a reenactment group, has a list of their ancestors on their website.

Pollard is one of them. The picture is included with a biography. According to the site, Pollard was born on August 19, 1829. He was married at age 20 and by his early 30s, he was enlisted. He survived the war and died in October of 1899.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Impressionist Hero Édouard Manet Gets The Star Treatment In Los Angeles

Manet was not himself an Impressionist, but he mightily influenced the movement. Two of his paintings are now in L.A. The Railway is making its West Coast debut, and Spring just sold for $65 million.
NPR

Stone Age Britons Were Eating Wheat 2,000 Years Before They Farmed It

Scientists have recovered cultivated wheat DNA from an 8,000-year-old submerged site off the British coast. The finding suggests hunter-gatherers were trading for the grain long before they grew it.
NPR

Jeb Bush Takes 2016 Show Into Unfriendly Territory At CPAC

Bush has appeared almost exclusively before friendly audiences since leaving the Florida governorship eight years ago, but today he faces a crowd of conservative activists.
NPR

'Ballot Selfies' Clash With The Sanctity Of Secret Polling

New Hampshire is the first state to outlaw voting booth selfies. Some call the ban unconstitutional and are challenging it in court. Others argue selfies compromise privacy and enable voter coercion.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.