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Maryland And Delaware Partner On Climate Change

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The University of Maryland is partnering with the University of Delaware to teach eighth through 12th grade students about climate change. The National Science Foundation is awarding the two universities $5.8 million to work together on the project.

"We have a partnership to work with our scientists, with our educators throughout our states, to bring the best scientific understanding that we have and make it available for use in the curriculum," says Don Boesch, president of the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.

The money will be used over the course of 5 years to develop materials and train teachers to help students understand how climate change will affect the local environment.

"The subject area of climate change is particularly relevant to the Maryland-Delaware region because of some of the anticipated impacts of climate change in terms of costal communities," says Jill Karsten, an education director at the National Science Foundation.

She says students may have to make difficult decisions because of those impacts and should have a sound scientific understanding.

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