FRC President Blames Other Orgs For Shooting | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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FRC President Blames Other Orgs For Shooting

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In the aftermath of a shooting that took place at the conservative lobbying group Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. this week, the organization's president, Tony Perkins, is calling for an end to "reckless rhetoric," which he blames for the attack.

Perkins says the suspect was "given a license" to shoot by organizations such as the Southern Poverty Law Center. The center says the Family Research Council defames gays and lesbians, and it has described FRC as a hate group.

At a press conference Perkins called that a "reckless use of terminology."

"It marginalizes individuals and organizations, letting people feel free to go and do bodily harm to innocent people who are simply working and representing folks all across this country," he says.

In a statement Mark Potok, senior fellow of the Southern Poverty Law Center, calls Perkins' statement "outrageous," and says the council has a pattern of "demonizing" comments.

Floyd Lee Corkins II, is charged with assault with intent to kill and bringing firearms across state lines. He has been ordered held without bond, with a detention hearing scheduled for next Friday.

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