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Dew Tour In Ocean City Expected To Shatter Attendance Record

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The Dew Tour promises to be bigger and more spectacular than last year.
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The Dew Tour promises to be bigger and more spectacular than last year.

The Dew Tour returns to Ocean City, Md., this weekend for a second year, and even if you aren't there to see the action sports event in person, you will still be able to have quite a unique view.

The Dew Tour's footprint is so big this year, it literally looks like a city on the beach. They've added a fourth stadium this year, bringing more than 600 tons of steel in 125 tractor trailer trucks and for the second straight year, the have poured a massive concrete skate bowl on the beach — a feat that's never been replicated anywhere else in action sports.

But, what spectators may not notice this year, is a small camera in the sky zooming along more than a mile of cable high above the stadiums, bringing unprecedented aerial views of BMX and skateboarding tricks to a nationally-televised live audience.

"It's not been done in action sports in this way, so you are going to see these sports in a way that's different than you ever have and feel the overall scope of the event, which is massive," says Dew Tour General Manager Chris Prybrylo.

Last year, Ocean City broke the Dew Tour's attendance record with more than 75,000 people coming in over the course of the weekend. But this year, with all the events being free to the public, that record is expected to be smashed to pieces.

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