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Up Against The Walls In Washington, D.C.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans by Americans for Americans.

This summer, I was one of nearly 200 cyclists who toured D.C. one night in search of the city's most colorful murals in parking lots and back alleys.

The tour was co-sponsored by MuralsDC, a citywide project that trains young artists to paint mural masterpieces over tired, tawdry graffiti.

"It makes art so personal and accessible at once," says Laura Lyons, 20, a summer volunteer.

Successful murals reflect a particular community's history and culture and consequently instill pride in residents, says Lyons, and the paintings allow everyone to experience something beautiful — without going to a museum or gallery.

Teresa Tomassoni is the 2011 recipient of the NPR/Washington Post Stone & Holt Weeks Fellowship.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
NPR

Chasing Food Dreams Across U.S., Nigerian Chef Tests Immigration System

Tunde Wey wanted to share the food of his West African childhood. So he crossed the U.S. by bus, hosting pop-up dinners along the way. But Wey, like many immigrants, found success can unravel quickly.
WAMU 88.5

New Challenges To Recycling In The United States

Falling commodity prices are putting a squeeze on American recycling companies. What this means for cities, counties and the future of recycling programs in the United States.

WAMU 88.5

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski

Kojo chats with Freeman Hrabowski, the president of University of Maryland, Baltimore County, about the future of higher education - and what he's doing to steer African-American students into science, technology, engineering and mathematics.

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