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Maryland House Making Slow Progress On Gaming Bill

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Maryland lawmakers are still working on the state's gambling expansion bill.
Matt Bush
Maryland lawmakers are still working on the state's gambling expansion bill.

A House subcommittee spent much of Monday poring over amendments to a bill that would allow for a casino in Prince George's County and table games at all Maryland casinos.

Some of those amendments were added to the bill the Senate passed last week, including one that allows the owners of the Maryland Live! Casino in Anne Arundel County and a casino planned for downtown Baltimore to keep more of their profits.

Speaker of the House Mike Busch defended the pace his colleagues were taking in looking at the bill.

"First of all, it was an initiative that came out of the Senate," says Busch. "Now, it's an initiative of the Governor. They had a bill originally. This is the first time we've been able to have our imprint put on a piece of legislation."

Opponents argue a Prince George's County casino, likely at National Harbor, would cut into the customer base at other casinos, especially Maryland Live!, which is the largest such facility in the state and opened earlier this year.

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