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A Lasting Legacy In Pomona, Calif.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans by Americans for Americans.

Dr. Jamie Lynn Garcia was a tireless champion for the poor, devoting her life to healthcare for all.

In 2002, she founded the two-room Pomona Free Clinic. Her community needed more. She spent the next 10 years building and staffing an expanded clinic.

In 2010 she was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. She continued to work through her chemotherapy.

On July 9, 2012, her expanded Pomona Community Health Center opened, ready to serve thousands of homeless and uninsured residents. That same day, Jamie learned her cancer had spread. She died on July 27, leaving a lasting legacy of good works.

Science writer Robin Marks runs a tour company in San Francisco and listens to KALW and KQED.

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