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Running For Others In Richmond, Ky.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts, and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans, by Americans, for Americans.

There is something special about Eastern Kentucky University: We call it "the Power of Maroon."

Eastern Further, a group of Eastern alumnae who recognize the positive impact that EKU has had on our lives, has organized a running team to compete in the Disney Princesses Half Marathon in February 2013.

We hope to raise $10,000 to seed a women's leadership scholarship that might encourage female leaders — the type of enthusiastic and supportive women who made our Eastern experiences so special.

The writers were college roommates. Afsi works for a construction company in Lexington, Ky., and streams NPR on her phone. Lindsey works for George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and listens to WAMU.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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