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Running For Others In Richmond, Ky.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts, and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans, by Americans, for Americans.

There is something special about Eastern Kentucky University: We call it "the Power of Maroon."

Eastern Further, a group of Eastern alumnae who recognize the positive impact that EKU has had on our lives, has organized a running team to compete in the Disney Princesses Half Marathon in February 2013.

We hope to raise $10,000 to seed a women's leadership scholarship that might encourage female leaders — the type of enthusiastic and supportive women who made our Eastern experiences so special.

The writers were college roommates. Afsi works for a construction company in Lexington, Ky., and streams NPR on her phone. Lindsey works for George Washington University in Washington, D.C., and listens to WAMU.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

Colson Whitehead On The Importance Of Historical Fiction In Tumultuous Times

Kojo talks with author Colson Whitehead about his new novel "The Underground Railroad" and its resonance at this particular moment in history.

NPR

'Cup Noodles' Turns 45: A Closer Look At The Revolutionary Ramen Creation

Today instant ramen is consumed in at least 80 countries — with culturally specific adaptations. The U.S., for instance, gets shorter noodles, because Americans don't slurp them up like the Japanese.
WAMU 88.5

Rating The United States On Child Care

A majority of parents in the U.S. work outside the home. That means about 12 million children across the country require care. A new report ranks states on cost, quality and availability of child care - and says nobody is getting it right.

NPR

Scientists To Bid A Bittersweet Farewell To Rosetta, The Comet Chaser

To cap its 12-year scientific voyage, the Rosetta spacecraft will take a final plunge Friday. Scientists will signal Rosetta to crash into the surface of a comet — and gather data all the way down.

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