NPR : News

Filed Under:

Even As Rains Ease, Disaster Grows In Philippines; 2.1 Million Affected

The numbers keep rising in the Philippines, where monsoons have overwhelmed Manila and other areas.

According to the country's disaster response agency

-- The number of people affected by the devastating rains, flooding and landslides has grown to 2.1 million, up from 1.2 million on Wednesday.

-- As the end of the day today, more than 580,000 people were either in evacuation centers or had fled to the homes of relatives or friends. That's up from 400,000 on Wednesday.

-- The official death toll stands at 19, up from 16 a day earlier.

Meanwhile, after briefly reducing the "rainfall warning signal" to "green," the nation's weather agency has raised it again to "orange." Though it's not expected to be heavy, there's more rain expected over much of the country and there's a "gale warning" up for the coasts of Northern and Central Luzon.

According to The Manila Times, "60 percent of metro Manila is under water." Urban planners, it adds, say that it's largely a "man-made disaster" caused by "poor planning, lax enforcement and political self-interest."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Encore: 'Future Shock' 40 Years Later

Future Shock by Alvin Toffler was a huge sensation when it was published in 1970. The book perfectly captured the angst of that time and prepared society for more changes to come.
NPR

In Prison, The Passion That Drove A Yogurt-Maker To Arson Still Burns

The yogurt entrepreneur who set fire to his factory remains in prison, but he's in better spirits now. "He's dreaming again," says his wife.
NPR

Biden: Bernie Sanders Is 'Going To Endorse' Hillary Clinton

Biden told NPR he's prepared to vouch for Clinton, who he will join on the campaign trail next week. "You're putting your rep on the line you're saying I think this person has character," he said.
NPR

'Future Shock' Author Alvin Toffler Dies at 87

Toffler's warnings about 'information overload' and the accelerating pace of change in modern society made his seminal 1970 book a best-seller in the U.S. and around the world.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.