NPR : News

Filed Under:

Fixing A Broken World In Chicago, Ill.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans by Americans for Americans.

On Chicago's northside, Ally Brisbin and Carla Bruni recently got fed up with throwaway America and launched Community Glue Workshop — an initiative to promote repairing, rather than replacing, worn-out toys, appliances and other possessions.

Carla's background is in historic preservation and Ally owns Kitchen Sink, a neighborhood coffee shop. Their project is the perfect marriage of two important themes that seem to be disappearing: handiwork know-how and neighborly bonds.

For now they host their monthly Fix-Up events at Ally's café, but they hope in the future to offer skill-share workshops and longer-term projects at a permanent place of their own.

Erin Stevens practices anaplastology — prosthetic restoration of facial anatomy when surgical reconstruction is not possible — in Chicago. She listens to WBEZ.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Jack Davis, Cartoonist Who Helped Found 'Mad' Magazine, Dies

Money from a job illustrating a Coca-Cola training manual became a springboard for Jack Davis to move from Georgia to New York.
NPR

Cookie Dough Blues: How E. Coli Is Sneaking Into Our Forbidden Snack

Most people know not to eat raw cookie dough. But now it's serious: 46 people have now been sickened with E. coli-tainted flour. Here's how contamination might be occurring.
WAMU 88.5

The Politics Hour – LIVE from Slim's Diner!

This special edition of the Politics Hour is coming to you live from Slim's Diner from Petworth in Northwest D.C.

NPR

Writing Data Onto Single Atoms, Scientists Store The Longest Text Yet

With atomic memory technology, little patterns of atoms can be arranged to represent English characters, fitting the content of more than a billion books onto the surface of a stamp.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.