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Fixing A Broken World In Chicago, Ill.

This month we are collecting your stories about the good things Americans are doing to make their community a better place. Some of your contributions will become blog posts and the project will end with a story that weaves together submissions to make a story of Americans by Americans for Americans.

On Chicago's northside, Ally Brisbin and Carla Bruni recently got fed up with throwaway America and launched Community Glue Workshop — an initiative to promote repairing, rather than replacing, worn-out toys, appliances and other possessions.

Carla's background is in historic preservation and Ally owns Kitchen Sink, a neighborhood coffee shop. Their project is the perfect marriage of two important themes that seem to be disappearing: handiwork know-how and neighborly bonds.

For now they host their monthly Fix-Up events at Ally's café, but they hope in the future to offer skill-share workshops and longer-term projects at a permanent place of their own.

Erin Stevens practices anaplastology — prosthetic restoration of facial anatomy when surgical reconstruction is not possible — in Chicago. She listens to WBEZ.

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From 'Unproud' To 'Hombre,' Election 2016 Is Testing Our Vocabulary

Merriam-Webster noticed the number of unique words coming out of this campaign, and has been using Twitter to report the most searchable words. Lexicographer Peter Sokolowski talks to Rachel Martin.

A History Of Election Cake And Why Bakers Want To #MakeAmericaCakeAgain

Bakers Susannah Gebhart and Maia Surdam are reviving election cake: a boozy, dense fruitcake that was a way for women to participate in the democratic process before they had the right to vote.

Republican And Trump Critic Ana Navarro Speaks On Election

Ana Navarro has become a standard bearer for Republican women repudiating Donald Trump. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with the GOP strategist about her view of the election, which is only 16 days away.

The Next Generation Of Local, Low-Power FM Stations Expands In Urban Areas

The next wave of low power FM stations is coming on the air. Initially restricted to rural areas because of interference concerns, nearly 2,000 new stations have been approved — many in urban areas.

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