Composer Marvin Hamlisch Dies; He Was 68 | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Composer Marvin Hamlisch Dies; He Was 68

"Marvin Hamlisch, who composed the scores for dozens of movies including The Sting and won a Tony for A Chorus Line, has died in Los Angeles at the age 68," The Associated Press reports.

According to the wire service:

"Family spokesman Jason Lee says Hamlisch died Monday after a brief illness. Other details aren't being released. Hamlisch's career included composing, conducting and arranging music from Broadway to Hollywood. His movies included The Way We Were and Sophie's Choice. He won three Academy Awards, four Emmys and a Tony."

As Hamlisch's website says:

"As composer, Hamlisch has won virtually every major award that exists: three Oscars, four Grammys, four Emmys, a Tony and three Golden Globe awards."

Playbill is also reporting his death.

Our colleagues at NPR Music will have much more. As they reported in 2000, A Chorus Line was the composer's first Broadway show.

Update at 10:07 a.m. ET. More Confirmation:

The Music Desk tells us that Hamlisch's death has now also been reported "by multiple orchestras he was associated with" as well as family spokesman Lee.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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