Tour Guide In Your Pocket: National Zoo Puts Out iPhone App | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Tour Guide In Your Pocket: National Zoo Puts Out iPhone App

Panda fans can now get their fix anywhere they have cell phone reception.
Mehgan Murphy
Panda fans can now get their fix anywhere they have cell phone reception.

There's a new iPhone app to help visitors of the Smithsonian National Zoo find their way around and learn more about the animals they see.

Available on the iTunes store for $1.99, the app sports GPS-enabled maps, walking audio tours, news and lists of the day's activities. For inclimate days when the animals aren't out and about, the app also features live cams and movies of the zoo's most popular inhabitants — including pandas, gorillas, lions, tigers and more.

For a bit of extra fun, the app also sports a "Zooify Yourself" feature, that lets you add animal features like red panda ears or oryx horns to one of your photos.

Proceeds from sales of the application will fund conservation and research operations. According to the National Zoo, the app is iOS only right now, but an Android version is in the works.

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