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An App, A Map, And Some Old-Fashioned Police Work

NYT columnist's iPhone recovered in Md. with help from Twitter

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Prince George's County police officers with David Pogue's iPhone after it was recovered. 
Courtesy of Prince George's County Police Department
Prince George's County police officers with David Pogue's iPhone after it was recovered. 

New York Times tech columnist David Pogue needed some help of his own from technology after losing his iPhone in Maryland, and you may be surprised where police found it.

David Pogue realized his iPhone was missing on an Amtrak train Monday night. He tried calling the phone and using "Find My iPhone" — and Apple location-based app. Neither worked because his phone was turned off.

After three days of searching — and a frequently updated blog post on nytimes.com — the "Find My iPhone" app sent Pogue an email saying the phone was turned back on — the app sent a map pointing to a location in Seat Pleasant, Maryland.

Pogue posted the map to his 1.4 million Twitter followers and the Prince George's County Police department eventually found the phone in someone's backyard. PGPD blogged about the colaboration. 

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