Webb Pushes Reform Of For-Profit Schools | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Webb Pushes Reform Of For-Profit Schools

Play associated audio

A new Senate report gives a failing grade to the for-profit colleges that many veterans attend, which is spurring a reform effort from Virginia Sen. Jim Webb.

For-profit colleges rely heavily on tax payer dollars — more than $30 billion from the government keep them afloat annually. Yet the dropout rate for their associate degree programs sits at more than 60 percent, according to the Senate education committee. With so many veterans attending for-profit schools, Senator Webb is calling for a veterans educational reform act. It would increase educational standards for for-profit schools receiving federal aid for veterans. Webb says it's essential to raise those standards.

"We could see this coming," says Webb. "You didn't have veterans' representation on the college campuses to the same extent that we had in the past war years when we kicked in this program, so we need the administrative support and we need the standards as existed before."

Webb's legislation would also require schools to disclose their graduation statistics. It's currently co-sponsored by 16 senators.

NPR

The Ol' Puzzle Switcheroo

Every answer is a made-up two-word phrase, where the second and third letters of the first word are switched to get the second word.
NPR

College Life Doesn't Have To Mean Crummy Cuisine, Says Dorm Room Chef

Sick of dining hall pizza, public health student Emily Hu taught herself how to cook — even with no oven. Now she's hoping to inspire her peers to pick up cooking skills and healthier eating habits.
NPR

Democrat Seeks Limits On Operations Against ISIS

Rep. Adam Schiff of California plans to introduce a bill that would authorize military operations against ISIS. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Rep. Schiff about the new legislation.
NPR

In Sweden, Remote-Control Airport Is A Reality

Sweden is the first country in the world to use new technology to land passenger airplanes remotely. At an airport in a tiny town, flights are guided by operators sitting miles away.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.