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Webb Pushes Reform Of For-Profit Schools

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A new Senate report gives a failing grade to the for-profit colleges that many veterans attend, which is spurring a reform effort from Virginia Sen. Jim Webb.

For-profit colleges rely heavily on tax payer dollars — more than $30 billion from the government keep them afloat annually. Yet the dropout rate for their associate degree programs sits at more than 60 percent, according to the Senate education committee. With so many veterans attending for-profit schools, Senator Webb is calling for a veterans educational reform act. It would increase educational standards for for-profit schools receiving federal aid for veterans. Webb says it's essential to raise those standards.

"We could see this coming," says Webb. "You didn't have veterans' representation on the college campuses to the same extent that we had in the past war years when we kicked in this program, so we need the administrative support and we need the standards as existed before."

Webb's legislation would also require schools to disclose their graduation statistics. It's currently co-sponsored by 16 senators.

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