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Maryland Man Who Threatened Workplace Charged With Misdemeanor

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Neil Prescott's cache of 25 guns were all obtained legally, according to Maryland officials.
Courtesy of Prince George's County Police Department
Neil Prescott's cache of 25 guns were all obtained legally, according to Maryland officials.

Prosecutors in Maryland have only charged a man with a misdemeanor after he was accused of threatening to shoot up his workplace.

Prince George's County State's Attorney Angela Alsobrooks says Neil Prescott can only be charged with misdemeanor telephone misuse. As it turns out, the state has no felony statute that makes it a crime to communicate a threat. Prescott allegedly told his employer, "I'm going to load my guns and blow everyone up," according to police.

A misdemeanor charge is punishable with a term of up to three years in prison, and a $500 fine.

"Unfortunately, Maryland does not have a law that makes it expressly illegal for a person to transmit generalized threats over the phone," says Alsobrooks. "This is insufficient especially in light of Mr. Prescott s alleged threatening statements."

In addition, Alsobrooks says all of the firearms including a variety of assault rifles and handguns found in Prescott's apartment, as many as 25 in all, were obtained legally, so no weapon charges will be filed.

Alsobrooks points out, the lack of a felony charge highlights the need for a so-called  threat law statute. She insists her office will lobby for such a measure, during Maryland's next General Assembly.

Meanwhile, Neil Prescott remains in Anne Arundel Medical Center undergoing a psychiatric evaluation. A warrant with the charge will be served upon his release.

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