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Congress Faces Final Bills Before Summer Break

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Congress leaves Washington for summer break at the end of the week.
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Congress leaves Washington for summer break at the end of the week.

This is Congress' last week in town before lawmakers leave Washington for their August break. Last week the Senate voted to end the Bush-era tax cuts for the wealthiest Americans. Analysts and many lawmakers say it was all politics. Even so, now the Republican-controlled House is expected to respond this week by voting to extend all the tax cuts placing tax policy front and center, as many lawmakers go back to their districts for the month.

House Republicans are also anticipated to give some relief to farmers in the Midwest who are facing a devastating drought, a drought so severe it's expected to raise food prices across the United States.

Besides dollars and cents, lawmakers also hope to work out an agreement on a new round of Iran sanctions.

And D.C. officials are sure to be watching the House closely on Tuesday. The chamber is expected to pass legislation banning abortions in the District after twenty weeks of pregnancy, which pro-choice groups say is an attack on women's health.

NPR

Writer James Alan McPherson, Winner Of Pulitzer, MacArthur And Guggenheim, Dies At 72

McPherson, the first African-American to win the Pulitzer Prize for fiction, has died at 72. His work explored the intersection of white and black lives with deftness, subtlety and wry humor.
NPR

QUIZ: How Much Do You Know About Presidents And Food?

It's week two of the party conventions, and all these speeches are making us hungry. So we made a quiz to test your savvy about presidents and our favorite topic, food.
WAMU 88.5

Your Turn: Ronald Reagan's Shooter, Freddie Gray Verdicts And More

Have opinions about the Democratic National Convention, or the verdicts from the Freddie Gray cases? It's your turn to talk.

NPR

Police Use Fingertip Replicas To Unlock A Murder Victim's Phone

Michigan State University engineers tried 3-D-printed fingertips and special conductive replicas of the victim's fingerprints to crack the biometric lock on his Samsung Galaxy phone.

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