Growing Diversity May Be Turning Virginia Blue | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Growing Diversity May Be Turning Virginia Blue

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Virginia's looking a little more blue according to a social scientist studying population trends in the state.

Dustin Cable works at the Weldon Cooper Center and sees two things that suggest the Commonwealth may be turning into a blue state. "We're looking at growing diversity and growth in Northern Virginia," he says.

Cable says Democrats have made gradual gains the state, and President Obama's victory in 2008 was impressive.

"If Obama can match those turnout rates this November, he's looking pretty good in Virginia," he says. "That's not likely going to happen."

The study says Mitt Romney has a more reliable base -- white men, affluent voters and the elderly. The population of people over 60 is growing in Virginia, but Cable adds, Romney will need to make inroads with some Hispanics and college-educated voters in Northern Virginia if he wants to carry the state in November.

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