Pleasure Project Brings Safer Sex Discussion To AIDS Conference | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Pleasure Project Brings Safer Sex Discussion To AIDS Conference

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While many of the exhibits at the AIDS conference are scientific, some workshops, such as The Pleasure Project, are more practical with their information.

This organization focuses on education, advocacy, research and promotion for safer sex that feels good, according to its website. The project was created to promote discussion of safer sex and have a positive public health impact.

"Sex has been eradicated from the conference, it's almost as if it's an airborne disease," says Anne Philpott of Pleasure Project. "The reality is, most people need to use condoms and have safer sex. And we're saying, why not sexy it up?"

The evidence review from the "Everything you wanted to know about pleasurable safer sex but were afraid to ask," publication by the Pleasure Project, will be announced at the conference.

The review also illustrates a wide variety of images to show how people from different backgrounds can all participate in safe sex.

"The images that tend to be used are very traditional and we wanted to make it much broader to respect the realities of most people's lives, that people with disabilities have sex, men have sex with men."

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