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Fight Against AIDS Spills Into D.C. Streets

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People hold signs and balloons as they participate in the AIDS March in Washington on Sunday.
AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin
People hold signs and balloons as they participate in the AIDS March in Washington on Sunday.

Hundreds of women and men marched today in Lafayette Park in front of the White House. The group spilled out into the streets from the 19th annual International AIDS Conference, currently underway downtown.

Among the marchers are representatives from the Women's Collective of Washington D.C., a group that has worked with more than 1,000 women and their families in D.C. Also represented are groups like The Feminist Majority and the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power (Act Up).

One group of protesters is asking for an end to name-brand drugs for HIV and AIDS treatment. They want the drugs made generic, so that more people can gain affordable access. Meanwhile, in front of the Bank of America, hundreds of other protesters are calling for the implementation of a Robin Hood tax to fund more research into the HIV problem.

While they represented a wide number of groups, the marchers were unified in their call for an increase in government resources to be used to end the scourge of HIV and AIDS.

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