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Iowa Senator Investigating FDA Spy Program

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Congress loves whistleblowers in agencies that are able to provide unfettered details to help them as they oversee the executive branch. So Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) was furious when he learned the FDA was looking at its employees' communications with lawmakers, journalists and with the special counsel. Grassley says the FDA also spied on the communications of its doctors who were worried about the safety of certain medical devices.

"There are so many violations here it's hard for me to remember all of them, but the basic thing is the instinct for a bureaucracy to think somebody overseeing if the law's faithfully executed is an enemy," says Grassley. "I've never considered myself an enemy of anybody. I'm trying to make our government work."

Grassley is investigating just how high up the spying program went, and he believes it was approved by the General Counsel's Office. He's asking the Justice Department to start its own investigation into the agency's efforts to quell dissenting voices.

NPR

Opulent And Apolitical: The Art Of The Met's Islamic Galleries

Navina Haidar, an Islamic art curator at the Met, says she isn't interested in ideology: "The only place where we allow ourselves any passion is in the artistic joy ... of something that's beautiful."
NPR

Tired Of The Seoul-Sucking Rat Race, Koreans Flock To Farming

More than 80 percent of people in South Korea live in cities. But in the last few years, that has started to change. Tens of thousands of South Koreans are relocating to the countryside each year.
WAMU 88.5

Virginia Republicans Warn Of High Energy Costs With Obama's 'Clean Power Plan'

Republican leaders in Virginia say Obama's clean energy plan would drive up energy costs and damage a struggling economy. Democrats say saving the planet is more important than the short-term problem of higher energy bills.
NPR

Hope Or Hype: The Revolution In Africa Will Be Wireless

Young entrepreneurs in Africa say that they're leading a tech movement from the ground up. They think technology can solve social ills. But critics wonder if digital fixes can make a dent.

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