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Poll: Fenty Would Beat Gray In A 2010 Mayoral Race Do-Over

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Former Mayor Adrian Fenty waving a campaign sign in Northwest Washington, D.C., during his 2010 re-election campaign.
Reid Rosenberg/Flickr
Former Mayor Adrian Fenty waving a campaign sign in Northwest Washington, D.C., during his 2010 re-election campaign.

If there was a way to redo the 2010 D.C. mayoral race, the defeated incumbent, Adrian Fenty would beat Mayor Gray, according to a poll of 1,000 registered D.C.voters conducted by The Washington Post.

Results for the hypothetical mayoral race showed that 57 percent would vote for Fenty, 24 percent would back Gray and about a quarter of those who voted for Gray would switch to Fenty.

The majority of D.C. residents want Gray to resign because of the scandals surrounding his election campaign, but Gray has no plans to quit, he says.

But Fenty supporters — longtime or more recent — aren't likely to get their wish, the former mayor says. While his approval ratings have increased to 60 percent from 47 percent two years ago, Fenty says he won't run again.

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