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Virginians Say Obama's Policies Are A Mixed Bag

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The election day prospects aren't quite clear in Virginia, as residents favor some of the President's policies, but not others.
Michael Pope
The election day prospects aren't quite clear in Virginia, as residents favor some of the President's policies, but not others.

A statewide poll in Virginia shows a mixed bag for two of President Obama's top policy priorities: ending tax cuts for high-income earners and the Affordable Care Act.

The Quinnipiac University poll shows a clear majority support the President's proposal to let the Bush-era tax breaks lapse for those earning more than $250,000 annually. Of those surveyed, 59 percent reported that they would approve of higher taxes on households earning $250,000 or more, if it will help reduce the nation's budget deficit. Enthusiasm for the policy is strong across all income groups except, perhaps not surprisingly, voters in households making more than $250,000 per year, where just 48 percent support the idea.

Meanwhile, 50 percent of respondents said Congress should repeal the Affordable Care Act, while 43 percent want to let it stand. Respondents were evenly split at 47 percent over whether they supported the Supreme Court ruling upholding the law.

Virginia has been identified as one of the key Presidential swing states in November's election, and it also has a high-profile Senate race.

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