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Website Tracks Cuccinelli After He Refuses To Certify Abortion Regulations

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Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, here speaking at a press conference in late June, is being criticized for holding up regulations for abortion clinics.
AP Photo/Steve Helber
Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli, here speaking at a press conference in late June, is being criticized for holding up regulations for abortion clinics.

Abortion rights supporters have created a website to call attention to Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli's refusal to certify new abortion clinic regulations.

Coochwatch.com was created by Stephanie Arnold, a former abortion clinic worker who now attends Eastern Virginia Medical School. She says that in addition to using the website to focus on the Republican attorney general, abortion rights supporters plan to attend his public appearances and press him on the clinic regulations issue.

Cuccinelli has refused to certify regulations passed last month by the Board of Health. He said the board exceeded its legal authority when it amended the regulations to exempt existing clinics from the strict architectural standards required of new hospital construction.

Arnold says Cuccinelli is abusing his power to promote an anti-abortion agenda.

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