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Renewed Chance In Maryland For Special Session On Gambling

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If a work group can come to a consensus, the Arundel Mills casino might not be the newest Maryland casino for long.
Elliott Francis
If a work group can come to a consensus, the Arundel Mills casino might not be the newest Maryland casino for long.

Maryland Gov. Martin O'Malley says progress is being made toward reaching a consensus to hold a special session this summer to expand gambling.

O'Malley met this morning with Prince George's County Executive Rushern Baker, Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett and Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake. The trio supports the expansion of Las Vegas-style table games at the five existing slots sites, along with a plan to allow a new casino in Prince George's County, most likely at National Harbor.

The governor says he's hopeful some alternatives offered by the House of Delegates will make a consensus possible. A key recommendation includes creating a gaming commission to set the state's tax rates on gambling proceeds, instead of leaving it up to lawmakers to decide.

O'Malley says there's "a little better than 50-50 chance'' on reaching a consensus. O'Malley has said he will call a special session, if lawmakers can work out an agreement.

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