U.N. Enters Syrian Town To Investigate Assault | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Filed Under:

U.N. Enters Syrian Town To Investigate Assault

United Nations observers have entered the Syrian town of Tremseh to investigate an attack reported to be the bloodiest so far since the uprising against President Bashar Assad.

The details of the incident are unclear, as The Associated Press reports:

"The Syrian government says 50 people were killed in Tremseh Thursday when its forces clashed with 'armed gangs' that were terrorizing village residents. The regime refers to its opponents as terrorists and gangsters. On Friday, the United Nations blamed government forces for the Tremseh assault, saying U.N. observers deployed near the village saw government troops using heavy weaponry and attack helicopters against it."

International condemnation of the alleged atrocity rose on Friday, as did the death toll, which Reuters is reporting is as high as 220 people.

Until this incident, operations of the U.N. mission in Syria had been suspended, but observers on the ground near Tremseh were "able to confirm shelling, helicopters in action and the presence of Syrian forces in Government checkpoints near Treimseh," Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said yesterday.

Ban said he was "outraged by reports of horrific mass killings," and called the attack a "clear violation" of the peace plan and international law.

As the BBC reports, the Syrian government says it was carrying out a military operation against rebel fighters and that no civilians were killed.

"Our correspondent says that, in contrast to the massacre at Houla two months ago, the opposition has not yet produced videos or a detailed lists of names of civilians killed.

"He says that activist and human rights groups have named a handful of civilians they say died in the bombardment of the village, but the few video postings they have produced, showing the bodies of young men, are consistent with the government line that many rebel fighters were killed."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

Making challah for the Jewish New Year lets the baker take a moment to reflect on life's blessings. The bread can be shaped into the traditional round, or a lion or bird to echo Bible verses.
NPR

Rosh Hashana's Sacred Bread Offers Meaning In Many Shapes And Sizes

Making challah for the Jewish New Year lets the baker take a moment to reflect on life's blessings. The bread can be shaped into the traditional round, or a lion or bird to echo Bible verses.
NPR

More Americans Favor Mixing Religion And Politics, Survey Says

The poll by Pew's Religion & Public Life Project also shows that three-quarters of survey participants believe religion's influence on American life is waning.
NPR

Seeking Frugal Tech Solutions For Nairobi's Jammed Traffic

Traffic in major cities in the developing world can be a mind-numbing mess. A team at IBM in Kenya's capitol thinks it's found an answer.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.