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'USA Today' Names New Editor

David Callaway, editor-in-chief at MarketWatch, was this morning named to be editor-in-chief at USA Today.

There, he will be teamed up again with Larry Kramer — the newspaper's new publisher. Kramer founded MarketWatch.

In an email to the newspaper's staff, Kramer calls Callaway "one of the best journalists I have ever worked with" and says Callaway "did a fantastic job building MarketWatch's newsroom into a digital powerhouse."

Kramer adds that "David will be responsible for furthering the digital transformation of the newsroom. He will oversee the overall content strategy of the news organization with an emphasis on furthering USA TODAY's evolution into a multi-platform media brand that provides high-quality and engaging content for our consumers when and how they want it."

Susan Weiss, who has been leading USA Today's newsroom since John Hillkirk stepped down from the top spot in November 2011, will remain the newspaper's executive editor. Hillkirk now leads USA Today's investigations team.

USA Today's print product, with an average daily circulation of about 1.7 million (according to the Audit Bureau of Circulation), is the nation's largest. When digital circulation is factored in, the bureau says, it trails only The Wall Street Journal.

Full disclosure: this blogger worked for USA Today from 1984-2009 and his wife is a reporter there.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Tabasco And Beer-Flavored: Not Your Easter Bunny's Jelly Beans

On the eve of Easter and National Jelly Bean Day, let us probe the mysterious origins and unexpected ascendency of the humble candy. And to celebrate, we've sampled Jelly Belly's newest flavors.
NPR

Obama's Favorite County — At Least When It Comes To Giving Speeches

The president has visited Prince George's County, Md., four times this year. It is the most affluent county with an African-American majority. It also happens to be very close to the White House.
NPR

Ohio's Law Against Political Lying Heads To Supreme Court

Can a state law prevent political campaigns from doling out misinformation? Guest host Celeste Headlee learns more from The Plain Dealer's Sabrina Eaton.

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