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Tell the World Your Big Idea With NPR's 'What's Your Big Idea?' Video Contest

I have a simple question for you: Do you have a good idea? Something that could change the world?

Enter your big idea in NPR's "What's Your Big Idea?" video contest from July 9 to Aug. 12, 2012, and you could win the chance to get advice on making your big idea a reality from a big name in science and technology. And even if you don't win that grand prize, we'll showcase your video on NPR's YouTube channel and on Facebook.

Maybe you've figured out how to turn yard waste into hydrogen fuel. Maybe you have a new navigation system for traveling through the solar system. Maybe you've found a new way to detect cancer long before it shows up in traditional blood tests. Or maybe you've figured out how to make the radioactive isotopes in medical tests less dangerous.

You don't have to be a PhD scientist to have a good idea. All these ideas came from high school students.

I know there are more good ideas out there, so I have a challenge for you. Make a video describing your idea and send it to us.

What's in it for you? Well, we'll help spread the word about your big idea by posting some of the best ideas on NPR's YouTube channel. We'll also promote them on the NPR website and Facebook. But if that's not a big enough enticement (and I can understand if it's not), I have something else to offer.

I will personally present the very best video to a leader in the most relevant field of science, so he or she can give you feedback. Who knows? Maybe the head of NASA will want to develop your new navigation system. Maybe the secretaries of Energy and Agriculture will like your yard waste scheme.

A few months ago, I talked with finalists at the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair about how they'd like to change the world. A few of their big ideas are featured in the video on this page. But you don't have to be a science fair geek to have thought up a way to use science, math, engineering or technology in a way that you think really could work.

We've designed this video contest for people ages 13 to 25, because we know it can be hard to get your good ideas heard when you're not a CEO or a PhD. You can make the video by yourself, or as a team of up to three people. It doesn't have to be fancy. But it does have to be no more than 2 minutes long or less, and follow the official rules.

Entering is simple: First, upload your video to YouTube. Then, fill out the registration form below. Then you're good.

So get going; all entries have to be in by 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, Aug. 12. What, you had something better to do this summer?


Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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