D.C. Activists Push For Campaign Finance Reform | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

D.C. Activists Push For Campaign Finance Reform

Play associated audio
D.C. resident Bryan Weaver is leading the charge to ban corporate contributions to political campaigns in the District.
Patrick Madden
D.C. resident Bryan Weaver is leading the charge to ban corporate contributions to political campaigns in the District.

The movement to ban corporate donations for D.C. candidates running for council and mayor, cleared a major hurdle Tuesday. Activists from the group D.C. Public Trust needed 23,000 signatures to get the initiative on the ballot this November. They turned in more than 30,000 signatures.

This movement emerged in response to the series of corruption scandals at City Hall.

"I think we've seen a crisis of confidence in the Wilson Building. There's just been so many small scandals," Bryan Weaver, a D.C. resident to helped spearhead this effort said. "This is a way to try to put your finger in this hole."

Most members of the D.C. Council have not endorsed the plan. The Gray Administration hasn't been shy with it's criticisms. Irvin B. Nathan, attorney general for the District, said this movement is too blunt in the approach for campaign finance reform and called it a 'meat acts approach.'

"He says meat acts, but I view it as Civil War surgery," Weaver said. "I really sort of view this as a way to save the patient."

Although the activists made a significant achievement, the signatures still need to be vetted by the city's election board, a process that could take weeks.

NPR

Director: 'The Interview' Is A Case Of Accidental Irony

Sony's movie, The Interview, was meant to be just a silly comedy, but now it's a symbol of free speech. NPR's Linda Wertheimer talks to its screenwriter, Dan Sterling.
NPR

Nutmeg Spice Has A Secret Story That Isn't So Nice

Nutmeg is a feel-good holiday spice. But it once caused serious bloodshed and may have even been a reason the Dutch were willing to part with Manhattan in the 1600s.
NPR

To Deal With Hostile Congress, Obama Can Look To History

President Obama will face opposition in 2015 in both the House and Senate. NPR's Linda Wertheimer talks to historian Michael Beschloss about how Obama will or will not work with the 114th Congress.
NPR

Facebook Finds That Not All Users Want To Review Their Year

The social media giant's "Year in Review" app has upset some who prefer to forget 2014's unpleasant memories.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.