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Metro Expands Service Today For July 4th Festivities

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Metro will run extra trains tonight to accommodate July Fourth crowds, but the agency is still warning people to avoid the Smithsonian station if possible. 
Matt Johnson (http://www.flickr.com/photos/39017545@N02/3841692368/)
Metro will run extra trains tonight to accommodate July Fourth crowds, but the agency is still warning people to avoid the Smithsonian station if possible. 

Metro will be running at near rush hour service levels from 6 p.m. to midnight tonight to accommodate Fourth of July traffic.  

Metro is estimating it will carry more than 500,000 passengers today. It expects especially heavy traffic leading up to the fireworks on the National Mall scheduled for 9:10 p.m.

Unlike in previous years, the Smithsonian Station will remain open tonight, but it will be entry-only at the conclusion of the fireworks display.  Metro is encouraging riders to avoid the Smithsonian and Federal Triangle stations if possible and suggests people taking the Green, Yellow, and Red Lines consider walking from nearby stations instead of transferring.

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