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Can't Stop Clogging: 162 Dance Teams Storm The Capitol

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The Rhythm-N-Motion Dancers blend the old school dancing styles with the new in this year's International Clogging and Dance Expo.
Armando Trull
The Rhythm-N-Motion Dancers blend the old school dancing styles with the new in this year's International Clogging and Dance Expo.

The International Clogging and Dance Expo has returned to Washington D.C. The Rhythm-N-Motion cloggers, about two dozen teenagers and young adults from Nashville, Tenn., strutted their stuff on the front steps of the Lincoln Memorial on Tuesday.

The front steps of the Lincolm Memorial played host 162 teams from 16 states, including Virginia, who have come to show off their clogging skills. The teams include cloggers as young as 6 and as young-at-heart as 80. There are even cloggers with disabilities, like Rob Pack.

"I've got a lot of metal in my hip, screws and plates, from an accident in '97," said Pack. "I don't dance like I used to, but I like to keep up with them as much as I can."

This isn't a traditional clogging exhibition. Traditional clogging techniques are blended with Appalachian dance, river dance, tap and even Canadian Step dance.

The expo went until 2 p.m. Tuesday and an encore exhibit will take place Wednesday during the National Independence Day Parade on Constitution Avenue.

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