Storm Aftermath Causes Uptick In Hospital Visits | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Storm Aftermath Causes Uptick In Hospital Visits

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Officials advise that people leave the chainsaws to the professionals.
Paul Belson: http://www.flickr.com/photos/8829172@N02/5590008222/
Officials advise that people leave the chainsaws to the professionals.

Thousands of Maryland residents are still experiencing effects from last Friday's storm, and it appears frustration is landing a few of them in the hospital.

Maryland governor Martin O'Malley says hospitals in the state are seeing a slight uptick in the number of people seeking treatment after being injured using chainsaws. It's being attributed to those frustrated with the pace of utilities in clearing downed trees and who don't know how to use the devices. O'Malley says this is not the time to learn.

"Don't operate them if you don't know how to operate them," says O'Malley. "Don't operate them to impress your wife.  Let the guy down the block who knows how to operate them operate them."

O'Malley also says hospitals are seeing increases in the number of people being treated for carbon monoxide poisoning, which is linked to improper use of generators. Authorities are urging people not to use the devices inside their homes.

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