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Tiger Woods Wins AT&T National Tournament

Tiger Woods and Bo Van Pelt were shot for shot down at the ninth hole and remained close for most of the round.
Matt Bush
Tiger Woods and Bo Van Pelt were shot for shot down at the ninth hole and remained close for most of the round.

Tiger Woods siezed victory of the AT&T National golf tournament Sunday over Bo Van Pelt at the Bethesda Congressional Country Club.

Woods and Van Pelt maintained their lead in front of their competitors as they stayed neck-in-neck for the majority of the final round. Both sank difficult birdies on the 15th, then bogeyed the following hole. The game turned when Van Pelt bogeyed on hole 17. All that was left for Woods was to par Congressional's signature 18th hole. His second shot ensured this victory.

The damage from Friday evening's storm forced organizers to close Saturday's third round to all spectators and volunteers. However, when the grounds re-opened Sunday, more than 50,000 people showed up to watch the event.

"It was a fantastic atmosphere to play in front of, and thanks for coming out and supporting us in this heat," Tiger Woods said after the tournament, highlighting his appreciation for the fans. "It was hot as hell out there."

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