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Governments Assisting With Storm Waste Disposal

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Storm damage in front of a home in Arlington, Va.
Jonathan Wilson
Storm damage in front of a home in Arlington, Va.

Friday's violent storm left a trail of destruction in its wake. Now, area governments are offering some assistance to those looking to clean up the mess.

Residents of Prince George's County can get rid of storm debris free of charge. Dropoff locations include the Brown Station Road Sanitary Landfill and the Prince George's County Yard Waste Composting Facility.

"It's bad enough for them to deal with the clean-up of debris, let alone pay to have us take it from them," said Beverly Warfield, with Waste Management.  The composting site only allows the disposal of brush or tree limbs, while the landfill accepts any type of debris. The offer is good through Friday,  but both locations will be closed for July 4.

In Virginia, county officials in Prince William are reminding residents not to burn their debris, but instead to chip or shred it and take it to the landfill for disposal, free of charge.

And in D.C., on Tuesday only, residents can drop off any food that went bad because of the power outage instead of waiting until trash day. A half-dozen city schools are participating as dropoff locations, including LaSalle Backus Elementary in Northeast, Wilson Highly School In Northwest, McKinley Tech in Northeast, Key Elementary in Northwest, Ferebee-Hope Elementary in Southeast, and Garfield Elementary in Southeast.

In Rockville, Md., city officials say they have some air conditioning units available. The Parks and Rec department is accepting referrals from those in need.

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