Governments Assisting With Storm Waste Disposal | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

WAMU 88.5 : News

Filed Under:

Governments Assisting With Storm Waste Disposal

Play associated audio
Storm damage in front of a home in Arlington, Va.
Jonathan Wilson
Storm damage in front of a home in Arlington, Va.

Friday's violent storm left a trail of destruction in its wake. Now, area governments are offering some assistance to those looking to clean up the mess.

Residents of Prince George's County can get rid of storm debris free of charge. Dropoff locations include the Brown Station Road Sanitary Landfill and the Prince George's County Yard Waste Composting Facility.

"It's bad enough for them to deal with the clean-up of debris, let alone pay to have us take it from them," said Beverly Warfield, with Waste Management.  The composting site only allows the disposal of brush or tree limbs, while the landfill accepts any type of debris. The offer is good through Friday,  but both locations will be closed for July 4.

In Virginia, county officials in Prince William are reminding residents not to burn their debris, but instead to chip or shred it and take it to the landfill for disposal, free of charge.

And in D.C., on Tuesday only, residents can drop off any food that went bad because of the power outage instead of waiting until trash day. A half-dozen city schools are participating as dropoff locations, including LaSalle Backus Elementary in Northeast, Wilson Highly School In Northwest, McKinley Tech in Northeast, Key Elementary in Northwest, Ferebee-Hope Elementary in Southeast, and Garfield Elementary in Southeast.

In Rockville, Md., city officials say they have some air conditioning units available. The Parks and Rec department is accepting referrals from those in need.

WAMU 88.5

Art Beat With Lauren Landau, April 27, 2015

An Irish documentary film tells the stories of two people on different sides of the Holocaust. A classic musical is on stage at a local theater.
NPR

Drop-In Home Chefs May Be An Alternative To Assisted Living

As people age, cooking can become difficult or even physically impossible. It's one reason people move to assisted living. One company offers a chef to cook healthy, affordable meals at home.
NPR

Same-Sex Marriage, In The Justices' Words

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments on the question of same-sex marriage. In the meantime, though, we do know a good deal about the views of the justices already.
NPR

Canadians Love Poop, Americans Love Pizza: How Emojis Fare Worldwide

A study analyzes more than a billion pieces of emoji data across 16 languages and regions to gauge how different nations communicate. Most emojis sent are happy faces and other positive symbols.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.