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Second Storm Forecasted For Saturday

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A fallen tree at neighborhood in Arlington, Va. after Friday night's severe thunderstorm.
Rebecca Cooper
A fallen tree at neighborhood in Arlington, Va. after Friday night's severe thunderstorm.

More than a million people in the region are still anxiously waiting for their power to come back after Friday night's severe storm. However, recovery efforts may be derailed later today as another storm front is expected to pound the area.

Daniel Porter, an emergency response specialist for the National Weather Service, says the region got hit with a nasty storm front last night that just isn't leaving.

"This same boundary is expected to produce another round of severe weather, which is capable of damaging winds that will track across the region late this afternoon and in through the evening hours," says Porter. "So that could exasperate the cleanup efforts across the area where additional trees could be knocked over, creating additional power outages."

NWS has issued a heat advisory for the D.C. area Saturday. The forecast calls for a chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 5 p.m. Temperatures are expected to reach near 101 degrees, with heat index values as high as 105.


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