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Supreme Court Health Care Ruling Prompts Foot Race In Press Corps

There were winners and losers in the journalistic race to get out the news of the Supreme Court's momentous ruling upholding the administration's health care law Thursday.

If this had been the Olympics, CNN and Fox News would have been called for false starts, or worse, after initially reporting that the high court had struck down the law. Public radio talk show host Diane Rehm got it wrong, too, during her Thursday show, although the NPR network's newscasts were correct, NPR's David Folkenflik reported.

The gold would have gone to Bloomberg News, at least according to the organization's PR people, who trumpeted a 24-second advantage over the Associated Press. Folkenflik tweeted that Bloomberg "got it first (and right)" followed seconds later by Reuters, AP and then Dow Jones.

But for my money, the real winners were the journalists who raced, literally, to get the decision out of the court as fast as humanly possible. Check out the slideshow for proof of their athletic prowess.

The photographers didn't identify the runners. If you know who they are, we'd like to draft them for the next ACLI Capital Challenge.

Update 1:27 p.m. : CBS News' Norah O'Donnell identified one of the runners as Jordyn Newcome, an intern with CBS Evening News. Hat tip to Daniel Wein.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

Texas Bookseller Picks 3 Summer Reads

Julia Green of Front Street Books recommends Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig, City of Women by David R. Gillham and The Evolution of Calpurnia Tate by Jacqueline Kelly.
NPR

He Used To Live On The Streets Of Mumbai. Now, His Cafe Welcomes Everyone

Amin Sheikh's new cafe is a rarity in class-stratified India: It's open to people from all walks of life. Sheikh is a former street child, and so are many of his employees.
NPR

For Many Black Voters, Trump's 'What Do You Have To Lose?' Plea Isn't Enough

Donald Trump promises to help bring jobs and security to black neighborhoods. But his poll numbers with African-Americans are in the low single digits, and many say his message is insulting.
NPR

WATCH: Squishy 'Octobot' Moves Autonomously

The robot designed by a team from Harvard University moves without the help of any rigid parts. Researchers say it is the first proof-of-concept design for an entirely soft, autonomous machine.

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