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Snapshots Of Summer In Russia

It makes sense that in Russia, where it's cold and dark for much of the year, summer would be a magical time. An article in National Geographic's July issue explains the cultural significance — and ubiquity — of dachas, or summer cottages: One in three Russians, the article reads, owns one.

According to writer Cathy Newman, Vladmir Putin swoops into his by helicopter; Boris Pasternak wrote Doctor Zhivago at his dacha; and Joseph Stalin had about 20 dachas scattered around the Soviet Union.

"The dacha has threaded its way through Russian culture ever since Peter the Great handed out land on the outskirts of St. Petersburg to courtiers," Newman writes. "The dacha is the stage upon which the drama (or comedy) of Russian summer unfolds." Everyone in Russia, she says, has a dacha story.

And photographer Jonas Bendiksen has beautifully captured that fleeting, lyrical quality of life.

Where do you spend your summers?

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Christopher Marlowe Credited As Shakespeare's Co-Author On Henry VI Plays

True authorship of Shakespeare has been debated for centuries. Now, the New Oxford Shakespeare edition will list Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe as co-author on the three Henry VI plays, part one, two and three. NPR's Robert Siegel talks with Florida State University professor Gary Taylor, one of the general editors of the new volume.

2,500 Years Ago, This Brew Was Buried With The Dead; A Brewery Has Revived It

In an ancient burial plot in what is now Germany, scientists uncovered a cauldron with remnants of an alcoholic beverage. They teamed up with a Milwaukee brewery to re-create the recipe.

Trump, Down In The Polls, Tells Supporters To Ignore 'Phony Polls'

While campaigning in Florida on Monday, the Republican presidential candidate accused the media of counting too many Democrats in their polls. Let's take a look at the numbers.

20 Years Later, Humans Still No Match For Computers On The Chessboard

IBM's Deep Blue beat chess great Garry Kasparov in 1997. Humans and computers play the game differently, but have computers taught humans much about the game?

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