Last Summer's Legionnaire's Scare Doesn't Shutter Condo | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Last Summer's Legionnaire's Scare Doesn't Shutter Condo

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One of Ocean City's high-rise condominiums remains open today, even after reports that two of its guests allegedly contracted Legionnaires' disease during their stay at the oceanfront complex last year.

Worcester County Health officials say they can't confirm whether the two unidentified guests, who stayed at the Sea Watch condominium at different times in 2011, were definitively exposed to legionella bacteria during their stay, but they will confirm that the bacteria was found in the building's water supply.

Legionnaires' disease is a form of pneumonia usually contracted after inhaling water vapors or mist that contains the bacteria.

Despite this announcement, the Sea Watch remains open for business. Condominium owners have been instructed, per a health department mandate, to inform all of their potential tenants about the risks and the dangers associated with Legionnaires' disease.

Last fall, there were six reported cases of Legionnaires' and one fatality after an outbreak at a downtown hotel in the resort city. Signs of Legionnaires' disease include fever, shortness of breath, and flu-like symptoms, and usually come to light within 2 weeks of exposure to the bacteria.

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