Just What Your Summer Beer Needed, Frozen Foam | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

NPR : News

Just What Your Summer Beer Needed, Frozen Foam

Apparently, it is just what it looks like — frozen foam, on a beer.

The Japanese brewing company Kirin — the one that makes those light, refreshing ales we drink at Americanized sushi places — recently came out with a soft-serve yogurt-like machine that tops a pint with frozen foam, according to Reuters.

Check out this video above to see how easy it is to work the machine (while rocking out to "New York, New York.")

The company promises the foam will not water down the beer, since it's made of pure beer. Plus, the beer foam will keep the beer cold for up to 30 minutes. That sounds pretty good on a hot summer day.

Wait, but who is taking that long to drink a beer? Kunihiko Kadota, Kirin's marketing brand manager for the "frozen draft" campaign, tells Reuters:

"Women and young drinkers spend much more time to drink it all up, and they like the idea the beer doesn't get warm towards the end."

I think we can all drink to that. Unfortunately, we'd have to be in Japan for happy hour.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

WAMU 88.5

'Historic Landmark' Status Complicates Corcoran Renovations

Plans by George Washington University to renovate the Corcoran Gallery of Art may be thrown for a loop after D.C.'s historic preservation board designated much of the interior of the building as a historic landmark.

NPR

In This Museum, Visitors Can Eat At The Exhibits

The Southern Museum of Food and Beverage in New Orleans chronicles the eats and drinks of the Southern states. And it may be one of the only museums where visitors can imbibe while viewing exhibits.
NPR

Staten Island Candidates Avoid Talk Of Eric Garner Case

In the New York Congressional district where an an unarmed black man died at the hands of police last year, neither candidate for a special congressional election is using the death to score points.
NPR

As Health Apps Hop On The Apple Watch, Privacy Will Be Key

The notion of receiving nutrition advice from artificial intelligence on your wrist may seem like science fiction. But health developers are betting this kind of behavior will become the norm.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.