Just What Your Summer Beer Needed, Frozen Foam | WAMU 88.5 - American University Radio

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Just What Your Summer Beer Needed, Frozen Foam

Apparently, it is just what it looks like — frozen foam, on a beer.

The Japanese brewing company Kirin — the one that makes those light, refreshing ales we drink at Americanized sushi places — recently came out with a soft-serve yogurt-like machine that tops a pint with frozen foam, according to Reuters.

Check out this video above to see how easy it is to work the machine (while rocking out to "New York, New York.")

The company promises the foam will not water down the beer, since it's made of pure beer. Plus, the beer foam will keep the beer cold for up to 30 minutes. That sounds pretty good on a hot summer day.

Wait, but who is taking that long to drink a beer? Kunihiko Kadota, Kirin's marketing brand manager for the "frozen draft" campaign, tells Reuters:

"Women and young drinkers spend much more time to drink it all up, and they like the idea the beer doesn't get warm towards the end."

I think we can all drink to that. Unfortunately, we'd have to be in Japan for happy hour.

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