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Opinions Divided On Immigration Ruling In Maryland

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The Supreme Court ruling Monday on Arizona's controversial immigration law has both sides of the immigration debate in Maryland speaking out.

Immigrant advocacy groups in Maryland were quick to condemn the Supreme Court's ruling that Arizona's law mandating that police officers check the immigration status of anyone they stop did not interfere with federal immigration policy.

"It essentially requires police officers to racially profile all of the people that they stop," says Sheena Wadhawan, with Casa de Maryland. "What we worry about is that this this part of the law being upheld going to make it harder for us in Maryland to fight against these laws that legalize and legitimize racial profiling."

Brad Botwin is with Help Save Maryland, an organization that supports tougher measures against undocumented immigrants, such as the one in place in Frederick County. There, sheriffs deputies enforce federal immigration laws under a federal program known as 287(g).

"There's no way that the people in power in Maryland will institute anything like the Arizona law, but they should," says Botwin. "The benchmark for our state is Frederick County, where crime is down, where costs are down, where spending on social services are down."

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