NPR : News

Filed Under:

Greek Workers Find Ancient Highway In Subway Dig

A Greek city's new subway project has led to the discovery of an ancient road made of marble that was laid nearly 2,000 years ago. The road in Thessaloniki is made of paving stones that show signs of use by both horse-drawn carriages and local children, the AP reports.

Archaeologists tell the news agency that the discovery in Greece's second-largest city unearthed a 230-foot section of an ancient road that was built by Romans. They believe it was a main thoroughfare for the city, some 1,800 years ago. The road's path is roughly mirrored by an existing road in the city.

Portions of the road were shown to the public Monday. The surface of some large stones bore ruts from carts; others seemed to have been used to play board games.

The city reportedly plans to display it in a part of the subway system when it opens. Archaeologists also found a Greek-built road beneath the Roman-built surface. They estimate it to date from 2,300 years ago.

It was Thessaloniki's second brush with history in a week. On Friday, workers found a six-foot torpedo buried along a busy coastal highway along a waterfront that's being renovated. The torpedo was removed without incident.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR

'Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon': Amanda Peet Explores Aging In Hollywood

NPR's Kelly McEvers speaks with actress Amanda Peet about her Lenny Letter essay, "Never Crossing The Botox Rubicon," and how to navigate aging in the image-obsessed entertainment industry.
NPR

When It Came To Food, Neanderthals Weren't Exactly Picky Eaters

During the Ice Age, it seems Neanderthals tended to chow down on whatever was most readily available. Early humans, on the other hand, maintained a consistent diet regardless of environmental changes.
NPR

4 Ways Donald Trump's Pro Wrestling Experience Is Like His Campaign Today

At least none of Trump's political opponents have been strapped down and had their heads shaved by him.
NPR

'The Guardian' Launches New Series Examining Online Abuse

A video was released this week where female sports journalists were read abusive online comments to their face. It's an issue that reaches far beyond that group, and The Guardian is taking it on in a series called "The Web We Want." NPR's Audie Cornish speaks with series editor Becky Gardiner and writer Nesrine Malik, who receives a lot of online abuse.

Leave a Comment

Help keep the conversation civil. Please refer to our Terms of Use and Code of Conduct before posting your comments.